Southwest Modern Blog Hop

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(copyright Lucky Spool Media, LLC: 2017 Kurt Griesbach)

Hey friends!  I am so excited today to share a little about Kristi’s (@initialkstudio on Instagram, http://www.initialkstudio.com ) new book with you.  She had me at pretty pictures, travel info and minimalist modern designs.  The deal was cinched when I got to meet the author at the latest Quiltcon.  Kristi is sweet, humble and a hard worker.  I love all of the above.

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There are so many great designs to pick from in this book.  I settled finally on her Chimney Trail pattern and used some fabric I had indigo dyed last year.  I love the organic vibe the hand dyed fabric brings to the very geometric design and think it stays true to the Southwestern theme.

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I backed the quilt with white quilting cotton and machine quilted horizontal lines.  At the last minute I decided to add some randomly spaced vertical stitching with traditional sashiko thread and needle.  I ran out of time to hand quilt as densely as I would like but will probably add some more with time.  There were a few blocks leftover when I was done that I decided to stitch together and made up some organic pillows.  I can see this combo being well used in the summer weather.

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Kristi’s designs are beautiful to gaze upon and her instructions make them easy to make. I am excited to share a book with one blog reader.

To enter:
1. Follow me (@entropyalwayswins ) and @initialkstudio on instagram
2. You must comment on the blog post to be entered to win. Bonus entries occur for those who comment on my Instagram post.

3. The winner will be announced Monday, March 12th at 5 pm.

Be sure to catch all the amazing bloggers and amazing makes in the blog hop and join in for more chances to win the book.

Also note, that Kristi is having a Grand Prize Giveaway at the end of the blog hop courtesy of the following sponsors.

1. Signed copy of Southwest Modern by Lucky Spool

2. FQ bundle by Robert Kaufman

3. FQ bundle by Me & You Fabrics

4. Southwest Modern Thread Collection by Aurifil

 

Best Luck!

Hillary

Felt Messenger Bag Tutorial

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Over the last couple of years I have been playing with a messenger bag design of my own imagining.  I have come to love thick wool felt as bag medium and have been using the design to pay tribute to important women using leather appliqué.  In hopes of inspiring others to do the same I wanted to share my methods.  My demonstration bag is an abstract design.  There are a ton of possibilities.

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Supplies

3 mm Felt ( I purchased mine from Aetna Felt  www.aetnafelt.com .  One 72” wide yard makes 2 1/2 bags.  You can also use 5 mm felt but it is much harder on a domestic machine)

Pieces of thin scrap leather to use as adornment (It is important to use very thin suede or leather to make sewing on a domestic machine easier)

Fabric Marker (I like Dritz Disappearing Ink pen or chalk pencils)

Quilter’s Ruler

Rotary Cutter

Leather Hole Punch

Small Sized Rivets and Rivet Setter(If you are uncomfortable with rivet setting, screw in rivets are a nice alternative and if you chose to use 5mm thick wool, I recommend medium sized rivets)

Thread (thick upholstery thread is ideal but I honestly use what I have around)

Fabric-Tac Glue

Two 2 inch metal D rings

One 2 inch metal Slide Adjuster

2 yards of 2 inch Black Nylon Webbing

One magnetic bag closure set

Leather Needle and Walking Foot or Teflon Foot for your Machine

 

Step One: Prepare your leather design and cut out your Felt Pieces

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-Draw out a design and then cut pieces of leather or suede to match that design

-Cut one Front/bottom piece 12 x 12.5 inches

-Cut one Back/top piece 12 x 26 inches

-Cut one Side piece 4 x 36 inches

-Round the bottom edges of your Front/bottom piece (remember that it is slightly narrower side to side then top to bottom to assure you are rounding the correct edges) and round all sides of the Back/top piece.  I used a 4 inch circle template but you can use a small plate or can as your guide instead.

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Step Two: Appliqué your leather Design

-Using your long Front/top felt piece, right side toward you, arrange your leather appliqué as you would like it to appear on the bag.  Piece by piece, then glue down and sew 1/8 inch from edge each leather piece.  Make sure to use a leather needle and a walking foot or teflon foot on your machine.

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-At the bottom of the front piece before glueing and sewing all portions down, insert one part of your magnetic bag closure if you like facing to the back and hide by glueing and sewing a piece of appliquéd leather over it.  (see picture)

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Step Three: Sew your side and Front/Bottom Piece Together

 

-Using a 3/8 inch seam allowance sew, right sides together sew the long wool Side piece and the smaller Front/bottom piece.

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-Cut any extra of the side piece projecting from the top

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-Right sides together, using pins or wonder clips secure the unadorned half of your long Top/front piece to the side piece.  Before you begin sewing, the seam should be 14 inches from the end of the long Top/front piece on both sides.  Using a 3/8 inch seam allowance, sew along the edge.

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-Invert the bag and prepare for strap placement

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Step Three: Attach your Straps

-Cut two pieces of the 2 inch webbing 4 1/2 inches long and cut another piece 50 inches long (a lighter or match used at the cut edges helps melt and finish the end of the webbing)

-Fold one short webbing piece over a metal  D Ring.  Mark 4 positions in each corner at least 1/4 from the edge and punch holes in the webbing at the marked spots using your leather hole punch.  Repeat for the second D Ring and short webbing piece.

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-Center each D ring/webbing piece on the side 1/2 inch down from the top.  Using your marker, mark each hole you have made in the webbing onto the wool.  Punch holes through the wool in each of these spots and connect the wool and webbing/D ring piece on each side with your rivets and rivet setter(4 rivets per side).

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-Next, wrap the long webbing piece through the center of your Slide Buckle and fold over at least an inch and a half.  Mark two places 1/4 inch from the side, mark, hole punch and secure using two rivets.

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-Slip the free end of the webbing through one side D ring with the wrong side of the rivets facing up and lace the webbing under and then over through the Slide Adjuster (see picture).

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-Fold the open end of the webbing through the other side D ring and secure with two rivets as previously described making sure the webbing hasn’t twisted and keeping the wrong side of the rivets to the inside.

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Step 4: Attach the Other Piece of the Magnetic Closure

-Using the already inserted Magnetic Piece as a guide, mark and insert the other part of the magnetic closure facing toward you on the bottom/front felt piece.

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You’re Done!  Enjoy!  Tag me @entropyalwayswins and the project (#feltmessengerbag) on Instagram if you make one.  I would love to see.

 

Hillary

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bee Sewcial Theme For October :: Unity

I am the Queen of our Improvisational Quilting Bee this month.  I have had a gazillion ideas but in the end this one feels right.  For this month I want to channel the idea of UNITY by making a quilt that uses long skinny blocks from each of my beemates.  See this tester block as a guide.

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I would like each of you to pick two solid fabric colors, one as the background base block and one as the “adornment” fabric.  I want you to pick a shade of pink or peach and a shade of blue or turquoise each in the medium value range.  Make the peach/pink pick your background fabric and your blue/turquoise pick your “adornment” color.  Please use only the two colors.

My vision is that there will be 10 long blocks all in a row “holding hands” by connecting mustard strips (as you see in the block).  Because I did not think far enough in advance and I want the mustard to match between blocks, I will sew them in BUT you can choose where and what angle the strip goes as long as it is somewhere in the middle third of the block.  Feel free to mark you block with a fabric marker to show me or leave it to me.  Either works.  I want the blocks to represent you somehow-the quilt will proverbially show the 10 of us standing together holding hands as long as you stick to your two colors, (one background and one adornment).

I need only one block from each of you and would like them between 5-7 inches wide and 40-50 inches long.

As always we would love others to join us.  Show us what you make with the theme by tagging on IG #inspiredbybeesewcial.

To Unity!

Hillary

Inset Pieced Strips on the Fly :: A Tutorial

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One of my favorite aspects of sewing is discovering new techniques while experimenting.  There are many weirdo sewing tricks I now rely upon but a latest discovery with piecing is so simple and helpful that I thought I should share more broadly.

Of note, there are several sewists especially in my Bee Sewcial quilting bee that have been dancing to the same proverbial melody in making.  I think of us often creating in parallel and most certainly learning from each other.  Indeed after I posted this tutorial on Instagram, my marvelous friend Marci (http://www.marcigirldesigns.com) said that she had used exactly this technique earlier this year without describing it.  For these reasons, the following technique is best attributed to our Bee Sewcial group as a whole.

Although I shared this on Instagram (where you can still find it under #insetstripsonthefly) I figured for posterity’s sake and easier reference I would make a more formal post about it.

I absolutely love some wonk in my makes.  Indeed I often seek it out as I appreciate the interest asymmetry adds to a piece.  There are times however when I really want things to line up perfectly, have a background seen uninterrupted through layers etc.  The classic “slice and insert” method for adding pieced lines in sewing is awesome but is frustrating when using sizes other then 1/2 inch finished strips (assuming a 1/4 inch seam allowance).  Unless you spend extra time with math, the background can look distorted.  I am actually a math lover, but the more time I have to calculate and think about sewing, the less fun it is for me.  This new technique works with any sized inset strips, doesn’t distort the background AND requires very little thinking.  All you need is fabric, scissors and washable glue.

Step 1: Gather you background fabric, some fabric strips and perhaps a plan (or not.  This technique is very fun to make up a design as you go.)

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Step 2: Line up your strip Right Sides Together(RST) with the background fabric along the line you plan to place your strip.  You may find it helpful to mark the line on your fabric with an erasable marker.  Realize that the marked line is 1/4 inch in from where the strip will be sewn to the background fabric.  Next, sew the strip using a quarter inch seam allowance (and keeping RST) along one side to your strip to your background fabric.

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Step 3: Fold the strip over along the sewn edge and press.  Unfold the strip back and iron a 1/4 inch fold all along the raw edge of the strip TOWARD the sewn edge.

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Step 4: With a light touch, apply your washable glue to the folded edge.

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Step 5: Fold the strip over and press in place.

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Step 6: Flip the whole thing over and cut with your scissors IN BETWEEN the strip the the bottom fabric 1/4 inch away from your sewn edge.

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Step 7: With the back still facing you, fold open and sew along the unsewn folded line.

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Step 8: Trim both sewn edges to give a clean 1/4 inch seam allowance.

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Step 9: Turn the whole piece to the front, press and add more inset strips as you like.

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I combined some inset strips, added an inset circle and then added more inset strips on top to exaggerate the sense of layers in this piece.  You can see how clean the technique is  by a view from the back (something I am often hesitant to do frankly when showing my makes!)

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There are so many ways to go with the technique.  (hint, hint: You can insert more then straight parallel strips this way). Below are a couple other blocks I made while playing around.

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I hope others find this tutorial helpful.  I would love to see what folks make with it.  If you are on Instagram tag me @entropyalwayswins and your make #insetstripsonthefly.

Hillary

 

Mary Schafer Exhibit at the Mercer Museum

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One of many things my friend Gwen Marston has taught me is that the quilting community at large is tremendously rich and it’s history important.  In that vein, I want to spread the word that now through August 13th at the Mercer Museum in Doylestown , Pennsylvania  there is a special special exhibit showing: “The Mary Schafer Collection: A Legacy of Quilt History”.

Gwen wrote not one, but two books about her mentor, Mary Schafer, American Quilt Maker and Mary Schafer and Her Quilts (in collaboration with Joe Cunningham).  Ms Schafer is considered an important force behind the resurgent interest of quiltmaking in the 1970s, an expert quilter, a detailed quilt historian and a mentor to many.

If you get the opportunity, don’t miss the exhibit of the work by this important person in textile art.

With permission of the museum I am happy to share a couple of Mary’s Pieces.

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Grapes and Vines : Mary Schafer c 1972, flushing, Genesee County, Michigan; Cotton with Polyester Batting, 88 x 98 ; Photo by KEVA reserved Michigan State University Museum

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Lee’s Rose and Buds: Mary Schafer c 1972, Flushing, Genesee County, Michigan; Cotton with Polyester Batting, 81 x 100; Photo by KEVA, all rights reserved Michigan State University Museum

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What a legacy we quilt makers have!

Hillary

The Metro Tote Tutorial

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I love simple designs made with top notch materials.  I also love combining nontraditional materials together.  In this case I share a very simple tote design using thick felted wool along with leather handles and quilting cotton scraps.  There are so many other ways to experiment with this bag design and I hope those who try it take my instructions as a jumping off point to explore their own creativity.

One finished tote including handles, measures approximately 19 inches high, 12.5 inches wide and 4 inches deep.

Supplies

3 mm Felt ( I purchased mine from Aetna Felt  www.aetnafelt.com .  One 72” wide yard made 4 bags.  You can also use leather or 5 mm felt but both are much harder on a domestic machine)

2 thick leather pieces 18 x 1 ¼ inch for handles or two 18 inch premade handles (I demonstrate with some stitched 18 inch leather bag handles I made but plain leather will work perfectly well.  If you are intimidated by leather and rivets you can also use webbing as handles and sew them directly to the felt)

Exacto knife

Fabric Marker (I like Dritz Disappearing Ink pen)

Quilter’s Ruler

Rotary Cutter

Pieced block or textile that you want to feature on the bag in a reverse applique technique less then 9 1/2  x 9 1/2 inches (I have used paper piecing patterns, leftover quilt blocks, improv panels made from scraps.  The sky is the limit.)

Double sided fabric tape (optional)

Leather Hole Punch

Small Sized Rivets (If you are uncomfortable with rivet setting, screw in rivets are a nice alternative and if you chose to use 5mm thick wool, I recommend medium sized rivets)

Thread

Sewing Machine

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Step 1: Cut Out Your Pieces

Cut two pieces of Felt 12 ½ x 12 ½ inches (front and back pieces)

Cut one piece of Felt 36 x 4 inch (side piece)

Cut a piece of felt that is 1 inch larger on all sides then the cut out motif you plan for your front. (For example, if you choose to cut out a 6 inch circle in the front felt to show off a special paperpieced block then cut out a 7 inch felt circle. The front felt bag piece with the cut out motif, your chosen feature textile/block and this third felt piece will form  a sandwich that once finished will make the inside of the bag look more professional.)

Round the bottom corners of the front and back felt pieces.  (I used a 7 inch diameter circle but a round plate would work well too.)

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Step 2: Prepare your Front Felt Piece for Reverse Applique

Choose a cut out motif that you will use on you front felt piece (in this example, I used a 6×6 inch red cross sign) , mark with your marker and cut out with an Exacto knife. In previous iterations of this design, I have used a circle, rectangle, lightning bolt and a combination of shapes that will show off the piece I plan to show off in the reverse appliqué.  Let your imagination guide you.

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Once your motif is cut out in the felt, sandwich your block or textile between the front felt and the back extra felt piece centering them all as best you can.  You may use reversible tape to secure everything in place if needed.

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Stitch 1/8 inch around the reverse appliqué motif through all layers.

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Turn the whole piece to the back and trim away the extra fabric.

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Further secure them all together by stitching 1/4 inch again around the block                 through all three layers.

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Step 3: Sew the Bag Pieces Together

The seams on this bag are all to the outside and there are only two of them.  SO SIMPLE!

Wrong sides together, using a 1/4 inch seam allowance, sew the front felt piece to the long side piece.  Trim any extra felt that is hanging off the top.  (Of note, I do not use clips or needles when sewing this first seam but just guide it as I go around the corners.  For the second upcoming seam I use a lot of clips)

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Wrong sides together and using a 1/4 seam allowance, sew the back felt piece to the side piece.

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Step 4: Attach the Handles

Using your hole punch, punch two holes along the horizontal bottom of each end of the handles about 1/4 inch in from sides and bottom.

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Set your ruler 2 ½ inches from the side and 1 ½ inch from the top.  Align your bag handle at the edge and mark the handle holes on the felt with your marker.

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Using you hole punch, punch holes at these marked sites and attach your handles to the bag with rivets.

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Congratulations On Your New Bag!

Tag me @entropyalwayswins on IG and use the hashtag #themetrotote so I can see your beauties.

Best!

Hillary

Easter Egg Pincushion Tutorial by Hillary Goodwin and Kitty Wilkin

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Recently Kitty (Night Quilter) and I had the opportunity to meet in person after following each other’s work online for years.  Both loving embroidery, repurposing textiles, creativity and the sewing community in general we plotted a tutorial that would allow us to play off each other’s creative personality and engage the greater sewing community as a whole.

A year ago I made an Easter Egg shaped pincushion out of velvet and repurposed leather.  We expanded on this idea and invite anyone who wants to participate to make a similar pincushion and, if interested, incorporate repurposed leather (Earth Day is coming up after all, and repurposed leather is typically thin enough to easily sew on a domestic sewing machine. Be bold. Be brave. Let’s sew leather!).

In this tutorial we give everyone some guidelines but the emphasis is PLAY and MAKING THIS PROJECT YOUR OWN.  Don’t celebrate Easter?  No biggie, make a similar pincushion in another shape.  We will be following on Instagram so please tag your makes #eastereggpincushion (as well as tagging @nightquilter and @entropyalwayswins) so we can all enjoy.  To celebrate this group project we will both randomly be giving participants some of our own pincushions as well as supplies to make them. All you need to do to be eligible is to play along, tag us, and tag #eastereggpincushion so that we can find you!


Suggested Supplies

Thin leather (~6×12 inches)

Wool felt, velvet, jeans or any other material for the inner portion of the pincushion (~6×6 inches)

Embroidery hoop (a 4” hoop will *just* fit the inner egg)

Egg Pincushion Template (print HERE) (note updated the pdf 3/20/2017)

Embroidery thread (embroidery floss, perle cotton, or 12wt thread works. Use what you have!)

Embroidery or other needle (Kitty uses Tulip size 3 milliners)

Double sided fabric tape or fabric glue (optional)

Sewing machine with a walking foot

Leather sewing machine needle 

Thread (Kitty and Hillary used 40wt Aurifil thread)

Chalk or other removable marker 

Muslin or other scrap fabric (6×12 inches)

Craft clips (both Clover wonderclips or Evergreen Art Supply craft clips work great)

Small Funnel

Crushed Walnut shell or other favored pincushion fill

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Step 1: Templates and Leather

Print the Easter Egg Pincushion HERE and cut along both inner and outer egg outlines.

Trace the template onto the wrong side of the leather, marking out two eggs–one with only the outline and one with both the inner and outer lines drawn. Carefully cut along the marked lines, remembering to cut one piece along only the outer egg outline and cut the other piece along both the inner and outer egg outlines. Set your leather pieces aside.

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Step 2: Embroidery

Using chalk or water soluble marker, trace the inner egg outline onto on your embroidery surface (felt, velvet, jeans, etc) so you will know the limitations of your embroidery design.  Adorn at your heart’s desire with embroidery, applique, etc.  You are welcome to copy our experiments but please feel free to try your own ideas.

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Step 3: Attach the Embroidery to the Leather Upper

Align your embroidered material so that the embellishments fit within the window of your leather upper (the egg with the hole cut out of the middle). Secure the right side of your embroidery to the wrong side of your leather upper with double sided tape, glue, or other method. Then, using a ¼ or ⅛ inch seam allowance, top stitch the two together along the inner egg as shown. Thread the top threads to the back of the piece, tie all loose ends together and trim. Finally, trim the seam allowance of your embroidered material carefully about ½” away from the stitched line so that it remains easily inside the outer margins of the egg.

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Step 4: Make an Inner Pincushion

Using only the outer margin of your Egg Template, trace and cut two pieces of muslin.  Sew the two pieces together using a ¼ inch seam allowance, leaving a small opening to use for filling.  Fill with crushed walnut shells (a funnel can be helpful for this).  One half cup of crushed walnut shells for this project seems to be the right amount. Use, a little more if you want a more rounded pincushion.  Sew closed the opening of the inner pincushion.

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Step 5: Finishing your Pincushion

Place the two leather egg pieces wrong sides together and secure with wonderclips. (Note that pinning will create visible holes in the leather–use clips!)  Sew around the outer margin of the egg using a ¼ seam allowance, leaving an opening at least 3 inches long unsewn.  Stuff your filled and fully closed inner pincushion through this opening.  Ensuring the inner pincushion remains entirely inside, top stitch the remaining way around the outer edge of the egg.  Thread the top threads to the back of the piece, tie all loose ends together and trim or bury.

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Step 6: Share your creation with us!

Tag your pincushion on Instagram #eastereggpincushion as well as tagging @nightquilter and @entropyalwayswins or link to the blog posts.   We can’t wait to see what you create! Enjoy!!

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Derivatively Yours

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There is a long tradition of learning by copying. My journey in creativity has been no different. I started quilting several years ago by making quilts by Kaffe Fasset and Malka Dubrowsky using their patterns and their fabrics to make almost identical replicas of their work. Attracted to the aesthetic of the Modern Art Movement and buoyed by my improved skills I soon started designing quilts using artwork seen on Pinterest as guides in my making.

Why is this germaine you ask? Last year I had two quilts accepted and displayed in the Modern Quilt Guild Exhibit at the Houston International Quilt Festival. It was the first Quilt show I submitted anything to. I was so naive to the whole process, as a quilt show virgin I think even Jacquie Gering weighed in on IG and helped direct me to a tutorial on making quilt sleeves. Of the two pieces that were accepted and shown, one piece I call “Life in the ER” was a fairly direct copy of a 1958 poster I reinterpreted in fabric. The other piece “5/325” was highly inspired by the work of Cecil Touchon but certainly not a direct copy of any of his work.

Fast Forward to this month when I have another piece hanging in the Modern Quilt Guild showcase in Houston. This piece, “Bloberella” is a work inspired by many but designed soley by me. In it I see the color inspiration of Gwen Marston, improv piecing techniques of Sherri Lynn Wood and needle turn appliqué learned from Carolyn Friedlander. It is unequivocally improved by the quilting art of Krista Withers.

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There has been significant unease over the Modern Quilt Guild’s recent blog post and discussion about “Derivative works”. As one who has been pretty derivative in the past I welcome the discussion. Clearly everything we make is to some extent “derivative” and I don’t envy the task force of the MQG who will need to parce out what is “too derivative” for consideration in future quilt shows.  For perspective, these copyright topics are not isolated to the MQG and have been evolving in the rest of the world too. I know in day job, I now need to get permission now to use photos by others for lectures. Speaking to my brother who is a photographer if he wants to gain profit from pictures that even display public art he has to get permission from the artist.

To be clear, I have not profited one cent from any of the derivative pieces I have made. In some ways though I have benefitted from standing on the shoulders of the design work of others though also likely have gained the disdain of purists.

This year of making has been one of significant evolution as I have directly steered away from trolling Pinterest and instead have been experimenting, designing, drawing, painting and sewing, sewing, sewing. Designing work from scratch is hard but oh so satisfying.

In all of this I am not suggesting that derivative work will ever go away (indeed there are several directly derivative pieces again on display this year at the International Quilt Festival from what I have seen of pictures). We all should be allowed to grow as quilters and artists and again the normal evolution of that process for most means being derivative. For me however it has become important to move forward and discover my own voice. I am finding that much more satisfying. In my opinion if I want quilting to be considered the art form it is, I owe it that.

Thanks for listening and keep making.

Hillary

Minimalism with Meaning :: The Story of Us

Last September I led our Bee Sewcial group.  My mission was to make two blocks in blacks and whites that said something personal about them.  I asked each member to embrace minimalism in the process.

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The stories they told me were rich and meaningful.  They described loss, triumph, compassion, family, recreation, personal identity.  Honestly I felt a little overwhelmed with the task of putting these meaningful pieces into something worthy of the sentiments.

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In the end, I decided to continue the minimalism theme and connected the blocks with extra negative space.  The words spoken when describing these blocks became the quilting motif in free motion quilted cursive writing (the first I have done this but certainly not the last).  The whole was surrounded with quilted borders and a gilded binding (purl soho mineral linen which sparkles when seen at an angle) to enhance the theme of story.  I want it to read like a well worn and treasured book.

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I hope that I have done these ladies justice in the making of our collective story.  Since it is so hard to read, I have included the quilted words for you below.

 

Minimalism with Meaning :: The Story of US
Positivity engages the negative space :: These are little womb blocks. The white ones represent pregnancy loss which is real but not talked about. The black ones are my obvious births, which are obvious and find it easy to see and talk about. The reason for the one with the white square with the black one is a permanent loss of being able to have a child from one side from the ectopic pregnancy I had in my tube. I love my two children with all my heart and grieve what could have been with my two lost babies :: Tall, strong, bend but not break ::When we are together, we are stronger :: My life can be best described as a wonderful mixture of family, work and my creative pursuits :: When using the right tools you can see things a lot more clearly. For me, it’s glasses (since I was 9) and calm. When life is chaotic for me, I get lost in the details. When I establish calm, I see better :: Frustration. From sun up to sundown I’m frustrated about any and everything and nothing at all :: Embrace: More expansive then a hug and open ended to be all inclusive :: Sometimes I feel like a square peg in a round hole :: A Quilter’s Table because that is me :: For me when it gets too active, too chaotic at some point I shut down and like a clean break BAM nothing gets done, nothing good happens, except I don’t get overwhelmed :: The top row signifies my family in height order and for now in this moment in time I am second in line. The shadow casted beneath our figures represents the amount of care required by each of us at this point in time. It is such a fleeting point of life but such an important one and I know I’ll never make anything as wonderful as my three children :: The pool is my favorite place to exercise so this is my interpretation of the swimming symbol :: Ascend as I am not one to begin anything by taking baby steps. If the stakes are high enough and you are determined success or fail you will take that leap of faith because it is your only option :: I am modern stepped in tradition :: My personal mantra is to look for the positive. light in the darkness as we need that positivity these days :: The balance of keeping focus looking ahead in life instead of behind but also being aware of your surroundings in a broader sense and how occasionally glancing back is a good and necessary thing :: A hint or clue a circle nature’s impossible shape standing out of the expected spot not perfect but industrial modern and minimalist :: In me you will find the place where science and art meet in the middle :: It’s about letting life’s annoyances roll off your back
Bee Sewcial 2015

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Hillary

Mini-Mes

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Last year I was challenged by Catherine (@knittingcatherine on IG) to a mini quilt swap using mostly repurposed or me-made materials.  In typical fashion, my mind came up with several ideas and I am sharing the fruit of 4 such finishes here (all of which let me “try on” different quilting styles I have been eager to test).  There are two other quilts made of my old tshirts that are part of this series but they and the concept of tshirt quilting are worthy of a post of their own.

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For my first quilt I grabbed some dress clothing in linens and silks that I never wear, chopped them up and reconstructed improv style.  They are much more attractive on a quilt then on me.  I also “tried on” some nontraditional hand quilting and made random “ant trails” along the piece.

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For my second quilt I wanted to play with Nicole Daksiewicz’s (Modernhandcraft) appliquéd hexie technique but decided to make my own spin with pieced hexies.  For this quilt I used some of my old scrubs, an orange shirt and a hospital sheet.

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After introducing a tertiary pattern and playing a bunch of designs I came up with the mini quilt below.  This is the one that ended up in Catherine’s hands and I call it “Colliding Migrations”

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For the last two quilts, I used some material I had hand painted over the summer and layered using a raw edge appliqué to show off unusual shapes.  These quilts have a lot of hidden meaning for me involving self reliance and the concept that things are rarely “Black or White”.

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Are these quilts my style?  YES as complex, varied and flawed as my style can be.  Are all of them masterpieces? Nope.  Did I learn from them? Yes, yes, yes!

Have a great weekend.

Hillary